andy wright

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 97 total)
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  • in reply to: Car Storage Tips #41584
    andy wright
    Participant

    Shell V-Power 91 Octane has been Ethanol free (in Canada) since it was introduced. Many US States require all gasoline to contain various percentages of Ethanol, so Shell was forced to add it to their V-Power in those States. So far Canada has no such requirements. Shell V-Power is the only premium gas without Ethanol as far as I know, so the Costco Premium and Ultramar Premium are probably re-branded Shell V-Power. Good to know!

    in reply to: 2008 carrera-Opening the hood #40147
    andy wright
    Participant

    If you have a 12vdc battery or power source, connect it to a cable with a Lighter Plug and plug that in to provide power to the car. Then use the regular electronic release.

    in reply to: HANS device reminder for upcoming season #27160
    andy wright
    Participant

    If a student’s car has Factory 3-Point Belts also installed, these can be used instead of the harnesses in situations where a HANS Device is not available for the Driver or the Instructor. Note, both Driver and Instructor must use the same restraint method.

    Andy Wright
    UCR Chief Instructor

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by andy wright.
    in reply to: 997 Airbag light stays on after battery discharged. #27014
    andy wright
    Participant

    I had the same thing happen on my 986 Boxster. I am told that the aftermarket Code Readers will not reset the Airbag light and you need the special Porsche software. If you have an independent Porsche Specialist that you frequent, I am sure they could help for less than $150 !!

    in reply to: DashCams #26511
    andy wright
    Participant

    Dash Cams vary in weight and size and therefore for DE Events double-sided tape is not an acceptable mounting method. Rigid mounting only is allowed. The concern is that if the camera breaks loose from its mounting, it will at the very least be a distraction and worst case could hit the driver or instructor causing injury.

    One thing to be aware of if wiring the camera to be ON at all times, is that this will increase the ‘parked’ drain on your battery. Make sure you use a solar charger plugged into the accessory socket or you might one day find the battery dead with no way to open the electric released frunk on your Boxster to access the battery 🙁 I know the early cars had this potential issue, not sure about the later models.

    in reply to: DashCams #26285
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi Brian,
    Our rule is that the camera must be rigidly mounted to the car, which usually means bolted or screwed to the vehicle. Safety-Wiring a camera to your interior mirror might work, although I would defer to our Tech Chief for his input on that. One driver used the same adhesive that is used to mount interior mirrors in many cars to attach a camera bracket to the inside of his windshield and we did allow that as it was a rigid mount. On a Boxster you might be able to make a bracket between the roll hoops to mount a camera, provided it does not impede rearward vision too badly.
    Andy

    andy wright
    Participant

    Very sad news. Angie (and Mark) worked tirelessly to help new and existing UCR Members and build the club we have today. She will be missed.
    Sincere condolences to Mark, Ernie, Gunther and Margret for your loss.
    Andy

    in reply to: My Apologies to the White Group #26189
    andy wright
    Participant

    In the instructed groups (Green & Yellow) it is usually the instructors that, if they see a problem with another driver, will approach them or their instructor directly and make them aware of it. Once you are in the solo groups, it is up to the drivers or the corner workers to bring problems to my attention and then depending on the circumstances, I will have Attitude talk with them or arrange for a Check-out ride by one of our senior Instructors. Of course, if it is a safety issue we will Black-Flag the driver and deal with the issue immediately.

    The White run group has the largest speed and skill level differential of any group and therefore a great deal of respect and patience is required by all drivers to make sure everybody remains safe and still has fun. Passing is usually the most common issue, either because drivers aren’t checking their mirrors or faster cars are being too aggressive behind slower cars. Hence the ‘Passing Classroom’ last weekend.

    in reply to: Why is Green = Yellow and White = Black? #26152
    andy wright
    Participant

    Yellow students are still learning and as you have indicated in your response, the use of passing zones between 1 & 2 and 2 & 3 takes a bit more confidence than at other zones. That is why we had the classroom. To burden Yellow drivers with that added pressure makes no sense. We now put instructors in with Yellow graduates in White for that reason, to teach them the new passing zones and see how they handle the traffic.
    As I tried to explain, the difference between White & Black is purely experience and ability. Why should there be any different rules from one to the other?
    To clarify my comments about combining Black and Red, this only happened when we had very small numbers (maybe ten in each group on a Sunday afternoon) and it is not anticipated to be repeated anytime soon. Especially with the number of participants we get now at every event.

    in reply to: Why is Green = Yellow and White = Black? #26150
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi Kevin,

    I would take issue with your comments on a few levels.

    Green & Yellow are not the same. In Green we have novice drivers who have a steep learning curve at the track and are obviously slower and less likely to be on-line than the more advanced groups.
    Being in the Yellow group means you have mastered the ‘basics’ and proven to an instructor that you can be fairly consistent with your driving, know the line and understand the work zones as well as learning to watch your mirrors and be courteous to other drivers. The Green and Yellow run groups are limited in their number of drivers (we have different cars/mile rules for different run groups) and therefore do not need more than the three passing zones.

    We do not move Yellow Students to White without still having an instructor in the car initially to familiarize them with the extra passing zones and much greater traffic. To be in White, you should be consistent, smooth (including being able to heel-and-toe) as well as able to pass and give pass signals cleanly. White has the greatest variation of any run group when it comes to skill levels and experience. You have drivers just moved from Yellow and others ready (or nearly ready) to move to Black. Drivers of all levels need to demonstrate they can handle these different capabilities while showing respect for all their fellow trackies at all times. Note that we do not promote drivers based on their speed (you cannot expect an 8-valve 944 driver to be as quick in a straight line as a 911-GT3 driver), but on their ability and behaviour.

    Black run group are the advanced Solo drivers that have shown they have mastered the values that make them safe, smooth and able to handle rapidly changing situations. It is also the run group that poses the greatest challenges to our track team. At this level, the cars tend to be faster, either because of horsepower or better driving ability. Speed differential can be an issue, but it is one that any Black driver should be able to handle safely and with respect to the slower cars. Big egos abound in this run group and we have also noted a sense of entitlement by some drivers who think that slower cars should get out of their way as soon as possible. Such behaviour is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. Everybody pays the same to participate in our DE events and should be given the same level of respect, regardless of what they drive. With 5 passing zones on a 2.5 mile track such as CTMP/Mosport, you should have the patience and respect to adjust your pace and hold back until you receive a passing signal from the car in front. Having ‘Open-Passing’ would not resolve such issues.

    We have in certain instances when run group numbers are low, combined the Red and Black sessions and allowed open passing, just as is done at the Club-Race Touring group. It is fun, but it requires a much greater level of both respect and skill between the drivers and if we see those attributes in a driver, (sometimes because of a check-out ride) they get noticed and brought to my attention.

    Regards,

    Andy Wright
    UCR Chief Instructor

    in reply to: Mandatory Front Tow Hooks for DE #26108
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi Markus, I can’t speak for all 944’s, but my 924S has a welded hoop under the front bumper to left of centre (looking at the front) that serves as a tow hook. We do require a tow hook at front or back of the car, so if not fitted from the factory an aftermarket one would need to be installed.
    Andy

    in reply to: Porsche Stability Management for DE #26066
    andy wright
    Participant

    Interesting Discussion here. This has been the subject of much debate over the years within our Instructor group and other similar DE programmes. The problem we face as instructors is that the “nannies” on newer Porsches are so good, a student will likely never know when they are driving beyond their skill limit, as the car is saving them from themselves. Just because the car can handle it, doesn’t mean you are improving your ability by going faster or braking less/later. Drive smoother to drive more quickly.

    The conundrum is, if instructors turn off the nannies and the student damages their car, or worse, who is liable. That is why as a rule, we do not do this. That being said, I have known instructors (especially in the Green run group) turn off the Stability Control just so a student can feel the car approaching its limits of adhesion. The PSM even when turned off, is still operating in the background and will still intervene if the car is truly out of shape.

    My advice keep the nannies on, but learn to feel when they are operating. That is a good sign you are pushing too hard.

    Andy

    in reply to: exhaust smell in cabin #26057
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi John, I’m not sure there is any easy answer to that without the use of a wind tunnel, but you could try a temporary lengthening of the pipe to see if it makes any difference. Far easier that shortening pipes.
    Andy

    in reply to: exhaust smell in cabin #26055
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi John,
    Is the smell present when you are moving of stopped, or all the time?
    If there really are no leaks anywhere (headers to engine?), then the only other thought that comes to mind is that the new exhaust flow exits in some way that the aerodynamics are pulling the gases forward into the cabin. Unlikely I know, but I have experienced that with some cars.
    Andy

    in reply to: dash cracks #26054
    andy wright
    Participant

    Hi Peter, I think it depends on the size of the crack. Splits in the vinyl can usually be successfully repaired by any good detail shop, but wide cracks are far more of a challenge. I would find a good detail shop or somebody that specializes in Vehicle Upholstery for advice.
    Andy

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