Dave Osborne

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Viewing 3 posts - 31 through 33 (of 33 total)
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  • in reply to: DE announcements #10209
    Dave Osborne
    Participant

    Hi Tom,

    While we may be out of touch with the paddock during an incident I can assure you that we are very busy on other radio frequencies and in constant communication with the Tower. When something happens on track, whether it’s a mechanical or an incident our primary focus is always the safety of whomever is involved and getting the program up and running as soon as possible. Any information given to the paddock must be correct, and that often involves waiting for additional equipment (sweeper truck or bobcat to lift tires) and recovering the vehicles involved. We have asked the staging people to keep the frequencies clear as well, so they aren’t encouraged to ask for updates either.

    The issue of instant updating for us would be the inaccuracy of the information. Say; we thought an oil cleanup might take 15 minutes. If we announce that information and then it takes 15 minutes to get the sweeper there, we may have to move on to the next run group and the grid would be full of the wrong cars. Rarely are the estimates accurate until we reach the last 5 minutes and the service vehicles have started to move. At that time the Tower announces who is up next and begins to grid them. While this is an instant information age, inaccurate information can be more harmful than none.

    The upside of this practice is that you can be assured that if anything ever goes wrong for you, you will have our complete and undivided attention until the situation is resolved. Safety is always our primary focus.

    in reply to: NHTSA Coolant Leak Investigation Closed #5440
    Dave Osborne
    Participant

    Unfortunately as they are an American Highway organization they don’t take off road (track) use into account. For the past few years we have seen an elevated number of these failures on track driven cars once they reached the 4 or 5 year old mark. Two of them have resulted in incidents with one car a total loss.

    While the NHTSA will not direct Porsche to resolve the problem through a recall it’s still the owner’s responsibility to insure that this failure doesn’t occur at a UCR event. It’s a shame that they “identify” the problem and still leave the owners financially responsible for correcting it.

    in reply to: Brakes sticking the following day #3342
    Dave Osborne
    Participant

    Hi James,

    What your experiencing is the rust layer that forms very quickly between the rotor and the brake pads. It happens in various degrees depending on how damp the air is and how much moisture is left on the surfaces when you park it. The more metallic in your pads is the bigger the pop when they release. I try and drive my car around the block after washing so they are fairly dry when I pull into the garage.

    It’s not harmful, provided the car isn’t sitting for months and the rust patch is scrubbed off after a couple of normal braking cycles. If you want to see it, just stop after the pop but before your wheel makes a complete turn. You will find an rust patch the shape of your brake pads on the rotor.

Viewing 3 posts - 31 through 33 (of 33 total)
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